Home Resources, Evaluations, Ergonomic Tips ... [ Articles]   [ FAQ's]  [News]   [ Resources]  [ Reviews]  [ Shopping]


HEALTHandFITNESS.com : 6/24/2017
Resources || Ergonomics || Evaluations || Links || Models || Videos

Ergonomic Health Tips

The following Ergonomic Tips are provided by Dr. Murray Grossan, (www.ent-consult.com) and are intended for general information. Specific information should be obtained by your physician, read the Disclaimer

Question:

"request for information for people already suffering from carpal tunnel syndrome. What can they do? Dr. Grossan says for both preventing carpal tunnel syndrome and for those suffering from it, you can use pads that rest the wrist. He recommends raising the hands over the head, stretch up and side to side, twist the hands back and forth slowly. It is especially good to immerse the wrists in water (preferably a jacuzzi) and use twisting motion and wrist flapping motions. What you are trying to do is to have the water force the "fluids" in the hand and wrist out of the hand into the arm and shoulder."

Answer:

Massage is also good. Try to get a wave going up the arm towards the shoulder. This brings the fluid called lymphatic fluid out of the hand and wrist and reduces swelling.

Question:

"I am a laptop computer user and I don't have any room on my desk for my arm to rest. I am getting a sharp pain in my wrists, why?"

Answer:

"Your wrists are probably bent instead of straight and aligned with your forearms. Instead, don't bend them or arch your fingers up to contact the keys. and welcome."

Question:

"what to consider when buying a chair for your computer station and is the posture at the computer is important?

Answer:

"Several things are important when selecting a chair. Be sure you get one that will support your back and one where the height is adjustable. Also, it should be heavy and solid. Posture is important. Be sure to sit up straight, with your feet on the floor. "

Question:

"Is it possible to get 'tennis elbow' from the computer?"

Answer:

"'Tennis elbow' is 'lateral epicondylitis' and refers to inflammation where the extensor muscles in the forearm originate at the elbow. 'Extensor' refers to the action of these muscles; i. e., they help to extend the forearm. This condition is by no means limited to tennis. It can develop from injury or from any activity that involves the forearm muscles. This condition is characterized by pain over the lateral aspect of the elbows and radiation of the pain down the forearm. It is aggravated by any activity that puts tension on these forearm extensor muscles. In reference to computer work, if you are on the computer for extended periods of time, you may be straining these forearm muscles. Treatment consists of trying to identify the cause (i. e., what activity or injury may have triggered it), rest, heat, and ice. In more severe cases, a cortisone injection, immobilization with a cast, or, rarely, surgery may be required. Consultation with an orthopaedic physician is highly recommended if 'tennis elbow' does not respond to rest, heat, and ice.

Question:

"I recently read that carpal tunnel syndrome may be caused by other diseases or may just be work-related. What do you think?"

Answer:

"Just as there are many causes for knee and should problems, carpal tunnel syndrome can be caused by repetitive motion or by changes in the tendons and bursa such as arthiritis and inflammation.

Question:

"Is musculaskelatal disorder the same as repetitive stress injury?"

Answer:

"The term musculaskelatal disorder can be applied to almost any muscle and bone problem, including repetitive injury. It is a very general term; sometimes, it is used until the doctor makes a diagnosis. Sometimes, it is used because the insurance company lists this and not other orthopedic problems. In the orthopedic doctor's office is a seven volume set of orthopedic disorders. Each volume is l,000 plus pages and lists many, many musculaskelatal disorders of which repetitive injury is just one."

Question:

"How many hours can you safely spend on a computer before a repetitive strain injury will happen?"

Answer:

"So much depends on the individual: the anatomy, the posture, etc. You can work relaxed and have good circulation. You can work tense and the muscles tighten giving you lots of edema and swelling. There are many factors involved."

Question:

"Where can I find speech equipment for my computer as I have a lot of pain using the mouse?

Answer:

"If you surf to http://www.tifaq.com/speech.html. You will find a lot of information about speech equipment for your computer. Various brands are listed and additional links are included."

Question:

"How many hours can you safely spend on a computer before a repetitive strain injury will happen?"

Answer:

"So much depends on the individual: the anatomy, the posture, etc. You can work relaxed and have good circulation. You can work tense and the muscles tighten giving you lots of edema and swelling. There are many factors involved."

Question:

"Sometimes my neck hurts on the right side and pops. Am I doing something at the computer to cause this?"

Answer:

"Neck popping and pain often indicates muscle tension and tightness; the actual popping may be an irritated tendon that you are hearing or feeling. The best prevention is to regularly stretch your neck muscles, especially before and after working on the computer. I also recommend taking breaks while working on the computer to stop and stretch your neck and back muscles. If the pain won't resolve with stretching, topical heat or ice may help placed over the neck muscles. A neck massage by a family member or massage therapist may help. If the problem persists, see your physician as you may need an x-ray to deterine if you have a more serious problem such as degenerative disc disease in your neck."

Question:

"Sometimes my neck hurts on the right side and pops. Am I doing something at the computer to cause this?"

Answer:

"Neck popping and pain often indicates muscle tension and tightness; the actual popping may be an irritated tendon that you are hearing or feeling. The best prevention is to regularly stretch your neck muscles, especially before and after working on the computer. I also recommend taking breaks while working on the computer to stop and stretch your neck and back muscles. If the pain won't resolve with stretching, topical heat or ice may help placed over the neck muscles. A neck massage by a family member or massage therapist may help. If the problem persists, see your physician as you may need an x-ray to deterine if you have a more serious problem such as degenerative disc disease in your neck."

Question:

"I have an excellent computer chair but still get some aches. Could my posture be causing this?"

Answer:

"Despite an excellent computer chair, posture is still very important. Make sure you are sitting in your chair correctly with your back striaght. Too many people slouch in their chairs and get aches and pains, especially in their back. Try doing some overall stretching exercises before sitting down at the computer. Take breaks every 30 mintues or so to stretch. This should help. Also, make sure your computer keyboard and screen are at a good height."

Question:

"My upper back is hurting me. I know I am sitting too far from the computer at times. Is this probably causing this pain (I use my right hand for the mouse.)?"

Answer:

"Yes, if you are sitting too far from the computer, it can strain your back. I recommend sitting at a comfortable distance from the computer as well as taking breaks to stretch your back if working for long periods of time on the computer. Being in overall good physical condition with regularly stretching and exercising your muscles is important and can help prevent these back strains. When such a muscle strain does occur, it is recommended to alternate hot and cold. Stretch the tight muscle and if it does not resolve, you may benefit from physical therapy."

Question:

"I recently heard a news report saying 'kids get carpal tunnel syndrome from spending hours on a play station.' Have you run into this?"

Answer:

"In my own practice, I have not yet seen kids with carpal tunnel syndrome from playing on the computer, but it certainly is possible. Carpal tunnel syndrome is usually caused by repetitive wrist movement which irritates the tendons and nerves which pass through a 'common tunnel' in the wrist; hence, the name carpal tunnel syndrome. Specifically, it affects the median nerve and flexor tendons. It is characterized by pain, numbness, and tingling in the hand and fingers. . .specifically, the first 3 fingers including the thumb and the inside of the 4th finger. A different nerve supplies the sensation to the outside of the 4th finger and the 5th finger. Treatment includes avoidance of the repetitive or strenuous activity which caused the problem and is often helped by wearing a wrist splint. By immobilizing the wrist in a neutral position while sleeping, it can often help the problem within several weeks. Some times, it is necessary to wear the splint during the day as well. For more severe cases, it may be necessary to see a neurologist for nerve testing to confirm the diagnosis; also, seeing an orthopaedist may be necessary for a cortisone injection or surgery. To prevent kids or adults from getting carpal tunnel, I recommend limiting the amount of hours spent on the computer and taking breaks."

Question:

"Is the cordless mouse better for you ergonomically?"

Answer:

"The cordless mouse would be better ergonomically since it would prevent repetitive movement that occurs from clicking on the mouse that is located in a stationary position. However, if your mouse is attached with a long cord, as mine is at home, it's easy to move it around and prevent repetitive related injury."

Question:

"What is the difference between a repetitive strain injury (RSI) and carpal tunnel syndrome?"

Answer:

"Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is a subclass of the RSI classification. An example is someone using the computer/workstation daily. They can develop neck pain, shoulder and arm pain, upper back pain and pain/cramping in the hands at night when they are sleeping. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome can also develop due to computer/workstation use and specifically involves a thickening of the flexor tissues across the wrist. This places pressure on the median nerve in the wrist causing pain and weakness. The best prevention is to do constant stretches of the hand and forearm and do light strengthening exercises."

Question:

"Dr. G., I would like to tell you that I have now bought a new chair thanks to your recommendation and the recommendations of others. I can't tell you what a difference it makes! Also, since reading your tips, I have rearranged my work station and that has stopped some shoulder pain I was experiencing. Please tell your readers how important the simplest changes can be at the computer!"

Answer:

"Thank you for your response. Hopefully some of the readers who still sit on a stool, stare up at the screen cramming their necks, will take your advice to follow my advice!"

QUESTION:

"What are the alternatives to using the mouse? "

ANSWER:

"The alternatives to using a mouse include trackballs, styluses, and touch pads. When using these, remember to get used to them slowly. Also, switch back and forth from one to another frequently. This will use different muscles. The real problem is overuse no matter what you use.

So, remember those breaks! They are important."

Question:

"What to consider when buying a chair for your computer station and is posture at the computer is important?"

Answer:

"Dr. Grossan suggests that several things are important when selecting a chair. Be sure you get one that will support your back and one where the height is adjustable. Also, it should be heavy and solid. Posture is important. Be sure to sit up straight, with your feet on the floor."

Question:

"What about the relationship of repetitive strain injuries and bicycling? "

Answer:
"If the hand/arm ligaments are already swollen, any additional strain/pressure will aggravate the condition. Bicycling puts a strain on the hand and wrist. Doing hand exercises in water may help. If there is pain, you should ask your doctor about anti-inflammatory medication. "

Question:

"How do I find the right doctor for a computer injury? "

Answer:

"Start with your family physician and asking him or her for a referral to a specialist. Then check with the AMA, local chiropractors, and physiatrists. What you want to look for is a doctor who treats repetitive strain injuries.

Question:

"I sit in front of the computer for many hours. It gets uncomfortable on my chair so I'm always moving about. I end up in positions that don't look too good for my back like slouching down on my chair etc. Would this have permanent effects on my back or does it not really matter?"

Answer:

"The name of the game is not to remain in one position too long. Move! Get up! Stretch! Turns out that the reason full time typists didn't get carpal tunnel syndrome is that they had to move the carriage over by hand, thereby changing position of the hands. Also, putting in paper, aligning carbons, etc. So the more you raise hands and stretch and avoid a single position the better. Incidentally, this is also important on long flights. You can get a blood clot if you sit in one position on the 6 hour flight! At any age, it is a good idea to do exercises that strengthen your back. "

Question:

"Is there anything else in the vitamin world that we can or should take to help with the radiation problem of electronic appliances, etc. such as computer screens?"

Answer:

"Dr. Murray Grossan recommends taking an antioxidant formula. These usually contain beta-carotene, vitamin C, vitamin E, selenium, zinc, copper, and magnesium. "

Question:

"Should my mouse hand have the palm touching the mouse or elevated so it doesn't touch it?"

Answer:

"Should you extend your pinky or hold it to your hand when you drink tea? Do which ever is comfortable. I go back and forth according to what I am doing."

Question:

"What can people already suffering from carpal tunnel syndrome do?"

Answer:

Dr. Grossan says for "both preventing carpal tunnel syndrome and for those suffering from it, you can use pads that rest the wrist. He recommends raising the hands over the head, stretch up and side to side, twist the hands back and forth slowly. It is especially good to immerse the wrists in water (preferably a Jacuzzi) and use twisting motion and wrist flapping motions.

What you are trying to do is to have the water force the "fluids" in the hand and wrist out of the hand into the arm and shoulder. Massage is also good. Try to get a wave going up the arm towards the shoulder. This brings the fluid called lymphatic fluid out of the hand and wrist and reduces swelling. "

Ergonomics: Page 1 || Page 2 || Page 3 || Page 4



[ Articles]   [ FAQ's]  [News]   [ Resources]  [ Reviews]  [ Shopping]

Google
 
Web HEALTHandFITNESS.com

Free Vitamins Offer
YOU have the POWER! H & F is Health & Fitness for Men & Women




Privacy Policy -- 1997-2010 cDp, All Rights Reserved --Disclaimer